Menu

Myanmar Aerospace Engineering UniversityAcademics

Department of Engineering Workshop Technology

VISION

Workshop Technology Department strives to provide quality technical education and prepare the students to become well qualified engineers competent to face global challenges and to serve humanity by acquiring adequate professional knowledge, skills and training.

MISSION

    The Department of Workshop Technology strives to continually engage in:
  • Ensuring quality teaching-learning process to provide in-depth knowledge of basic concepts, principles and applications of processes, tools and systems pertaining to Workshop Technology, Production Technology and interdisciplinary areas.
  • Providing practical training through state-of-the-art laboratory facilities.
  • Involving the students in innovative and group work exercises and projects useful for real-life applications.
  • Preparing the students in developing research, design, entrepreneurial and employability capabilities.
  • Providing consultancy services and promoting Industry-Department interactions.
  • Enhancing the visibility of the Department through seminars, workshops and publications.

PROGRAMME EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES (PEOs)

    The Programme educational objectives of the students in Workshop Technology Department are:
  • PEO 1: Provide students with the fundamental technical knowledge and skills in workshop and production engineering to recognize, analyze and solve problems, and to apply these abilities to the generation of new knowledge, ideas or products in industry or government; and to implement these solutions in practice.
  • PEO 2: Provide students with the necessary instruction and practical experience to work well in local and international team environments and to be effective written and oral communicators, both for communicating ideas to other people, mentoring, and for learning from others.
  • PEO 3: Produce students who recognize the importance of and engage in life-long learning, whether through self-study, continuing education courses or workshops, or through formal graduate level education and encourage others to have this same motivation.
  • PEO 4: Produce students who have an understanding of ethical responsibility and service towards their peers, employers, and society and follow these precepts in their daily lives.

PROGRAMME OUTCOMES (POs)

    Students in Workshop Technology Department should at the time of their graduation be in possession of:
  • 1. An ability to apply knowledge of workshop and production engineering fundamentals, and mechanical engineering for the solution of complex engineering problems.
  • 2. Ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems.
  • 3. An ability to design and develop as model, component, or process to meet desired needs with in constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability.
  • 4. An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data.
  • 5. Select and apply appropriate techniques, resources and modern engineering and IT tools, including prediction and modeling, to broadly defined engineering activities with an understanding of the limitations.
  • 6. An understanding of professional, social and ethical responsibility.
  • 7. The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context for sustainable development.
  • 8. Commitment to professional ethics and norms of engineering practice.
  • 9. An ability to function on multi disciplinary teams.
  • 10. An ability to communicate effectively and prepare reports, documentations and presentations.
  • 11. An ability to exhibit knowledge understanding and application management principles.
  • 12. Recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning.

VISION

Workshop Technology Department strives to provide quality technical education and prepare the students to become well qualified engineers competent to face global challenges and to serve humanity by acquiring adequate professional knowledge, skills and training.

MISSION

    The Department of Workshop Technology strives to continually engage in:
  • Ensuring quality teaching-learning process to provide in-depth knowledge of basic concepts, principles and applications of processes, tools and systems pertaining to Workshop Technology, Production Technology and interdisciplinary areas.
  • Providing practical training through state-of-the-art laboratory facilities.
  • Involving the students in innovative and group work exercises and projects useful for real-life applications.
  • Preparing the students in developing research, design, entrepreneurial and employability capabilities.
  • Providing consultancy services and promoting Industry-Department interactions.
  • Enhancing the visibility of the Department through seminars, workshops and publications.

PROGRAMME EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES (PEOs)

    The Programme educational objectives of the students in Workshop Technology Department are:
  • PEO 1: Provide students with the fundamental technical knowledge and skills in workshop and production engineering to recognize, analyze and solve problems, and to apply these abilities to the generation of new knowledge, ideas or products in industry or government; and to implement these solutions in practice.
  • PEO 2: Provide students with the necessary instruction and practical experience to work well in local and international team environments and to be effective written and oral communicators, both for communicating ideas to other people, mentoring, and for learning from others.
  • PEO 3: Produce students who recognize the importance of and engage in life-long learning, whether through self-study, continuing education courses or workshops, or through formal graduate level education and encourage others to have this same motivation.
  • PEO 4: Produce students who have an understanding of ethical responsibility and service towards their peers, employers, and society and follow these precepts in their daily lives.

PROGRAMME OUTCOMES (POs)

    Students in Workshop Technology Department should at the time of their graduation be in possession of:
  • 1. An ability to apply knowledge of workshop and production engineering fundamentals, and mechanical engineering for the solution of complex engineering problems.
  • 2. Ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems.
  • 3. An ability to design and develop as model, component, or process to meet desired needs with in constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability.
  • 4. An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data.
  • 5. Select and apply appropriate techniques, resources and modern engineering and IT tools, including prediction and modeling, to broadly defined engineering activities with an understanding of the limitations.
  • 6. An understanding of professional, social and ethical responsibility.
  • 7. The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context for sustainable development.
  • 8. Commitment to professional ethics and norms of engineering practice.
  • 9. An ability to function on multi disciplinary teams.
  • 10. An ability to communicate effectively and prepare reports, documentations and presentations.
  • 11. An ability to exhibit knowledge understanding and application management principles.
  • 12. Recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning.

STAFF PROFILES

Name: Dr. Nan Oo
Academic: A.G.T.I(Mechanical Power)Mandalay G.T.I, B.E (Mechanical) M.T.U,M.sc (Engineering,Liquid Rocket Engine) B.M.S.T.U (Russia), PhD (Mechanical) M.T.U.
Research Interest: Mechanical Field in Space Technology
Post: Associate Professor,Head of Department of Workshop Technology
Current Projects: Teaching Aid Projects, Renewable Energy Project, Free Energy Project, Rocket Engine Project.
Publication: “Design and Performance Parameters of Combustion Chamber and Nozzle of Liquid Fuel Small Thrust Engine”, The second international conference on science and engineering,3(2)(2010)24-28.
Name: U Aung Soe Linn
Academic: A.G.T.I(Machine Tools) Taungoo G.T.I,B-Tech(Mechatronics)M.T.U, B.E(Production)Y.T.U,M.E (Mechanical, Thesis) M.T.U
Post: Lecturer
Current Projects: Teaching Aid CNC Milling Machine Project, Renewable Energy Project, Free Energy Project.
Name U Kyaw Kyaw Soe
Academic B.E(Aeronautical) Y.T.U
Post Lecturer
Current Project Teaching Aid CNC Milling Machine Project, Free Energy Project.
Name U Aung Myint Thein
Academic A.G.T.I(Mechanical Power)
Post Assistant Lecturer
Current Project Teaching Aid CNC Milling Machine Project, Free Energy Project.
Name U Myo Lwin Oo
Academic A.G.T.I(Mechanical Power), B-Tech(Mechanical)
Post Staff Officer (Laboratory)
Current Project Teaching Aid CNC Milling Machine Project, Free Energy Project.
Name U Kyaw Ko Ko
Academic G.T.H.S (Mechanical Power)
Post Crafts Man Mechanic (5)
Current Project Teaching Aid CNC Milling Machine Project, Free Energy Project.

Academic Year 2015-2016 Teaching Plan for First Term(Subject Code:WS-2001)

Chapter Topics/Sub-topics of Syllabus Total Periods Total Duration (Week)
1

MEASURING INSTRUMENTS

1.1 Introduction

1.2 Steel Rule

1.3 Calipers

     1.3.1 Outside Caliper

     1.3.2 Inside Caliper

     1.3.3 Odd-leg Caliper

1.4 Divider

1.5 Micrometers

     1.5.1 Outside Micrometer

     1.5.2 Inside Micrometer

     1.5.3 Depth Gauge Micrometer

1.6 Vernier

     1.6.1 Vernier Caliper

     1.6.2 Vernier Height Gauge

     1.6.3 Vernier Depth Gauge

1.7 Gauges

     1.7.1 Radius Gauge

     1.7.2 Feeler Gauge

     1.7.3 Screw Pitch Gauge

     1.7.4 Telescopic Gauge

1.8 Dial Indicator

1.9 Care of Instruments

2 2
2

MEASURING TECHNIQUE

2.1 Test for Flatness

2.2 Test for Squareness

2.3 Test for Parallelism

2.4 Test for Roundness and Concentricity

2.5 Angular Test

2 2
3

SAFETY IN WORKSHOP

3.1 Accidents 

3.2 Machine tools and their hazards

3.3 Safety for Machine Shop

     3.3.1 General Safety

     3.3.2 Clothing and Safety Equipments

     3.3.3 House Keeping

3.4 Safety for Arc Welding

     3.4.1 Electric Shock

     3.4.2 Poisoning with welding fume

     3.4.3 Burn with arc ray

     3.4.4 Burn with hot metal

     3.4.5 Bruise

2 2
4

BENCH WORK

4.1 Definition

4.2 Fitting Bench

4.3 Fitting Vice

     4.3.1 Quick Acting Type

     4.3.2 Fixed Type

4.4 Hammer

     4.4.1 Ball Peen Hammer

     4.4.2 Straight Peen Hammer

     4.4.3 Cross Peen Hammer

     4.4.4 Soft Hammer

     4.4.5 Soft Face Hammer

     4.4.6 Mallet

     4.4.7 Safety for Hammer

4.5 Chisel

     4.5.1 Flat Chisel

     4.5.2 Cross Cut Chisel

     4.5.3 Round Nose Chisel

     4.5.4 Diamond Point Chisel

     4.5.5 Safety for Chisel

4.6 Hacksaw

     4.6.1 Frame

     4.6.2 Blade

     4.6.3 Causes of Accident

4.7 Fitting File

     4.7.1 Length of File

     4.7.2 Types of Section

     4.7.3 Types of Cut

     4.7.4 Grade of Cut

     4.7.5 Safety for File

4.8 Taps

     4.8.1 Types of tap

     4.8.2 Tapping Method

4.9 Dies

     4.9.1 Types of Die

     4.9.2 Threading Method

4 2
5

WELDING PROCESS

5.1 Introduction

5.2 Advantages of Welding

5.3 Disadvantages of Welding

5.4 Arc Welding

     5.4.1 Carbon Arc Welding

     5.4.2 Metal Arc Welding

5.5 Inert Gas Arc Welding

     5.5.1 Tungsten Inert Gas Arc Welding

     5.5.2 Metal Inert Gas Welding

     5.5.3 Safety in Inert Gas Welding

5.6 Oxyacetylene Gas Welding

     5.6.1 Adjustment of Flame

     5.6.2 Basic Equipments of OAW

     5.6.3 Comparison with Arc Welding

4 2
6

CARPENTRY PROCESSES

6.1 Timber

     6.1.1 Types of Timber

     6.1.2 Advantages of Timber

     6.1.3 Classification of Timber

     6.1.4 Characteristics of Good Timber

     6.1.5 Characteristics of Hard Wood

     6.1.6 Characteristics of Soft Wood

     6.1.7 Conversion of Timber

     6.1.8 Market Forms Of Timber

6.2 Carpenter’s Tools

     6.2.1 Marking, Measuring and Inspecting Tools

     6.2.2 Cutting Tools

             6.2.2.1 Saw

             6.2.2.2 Axe

             6.2.2.3 Chisel

     6.2.3 Planing Tools

     6.2.4 Boring and Drilling Tools

     6.2.5 Fixing and Striking Tools

     6.2.6 Holding and Miscellaneous Tools

6.3 Common Wood Joints

     6.3.1 Butt Joints

     6.3.2 Lap Joints

6.4 Common Wood Working Processes

6.5 Common Wood Working Machines

     6.5.1 Wood Working Lathe

     6.5.2 Circular Saw

     6.5.3 Bend Saw

6 2
7

MACHINE TOOLS

7.1 Classification Of Machine Tools

7.2 Definition

     7.2.1 Metal Process

     7.2.2 Machining

     7.2.3 Machinability

7.3 Chief Elements of Metal Cutting

     7.3.1 Chip Formation

     7.3.2 Chip Thickness

     7.3.3 Chip Width

     7.3.4 Chip Cross Sectional Area

     7.3.5 Cutting Speed

     7.3.6 Feed

     7.3.7 Depth of Cut

7.4 Machine Tool Principles

     7.4.1 Forming

     7.4.2 Generating

7.5 Force acting on Metal Cutting

     7.5.1 Tangential Force

     7.5.2 Radial Force

     7.5.3 Feed Force

7.6 Power required in metal cutting

     7.6.1 Specific Cutting Pressure

     7.6.2 Horse power on Cutting Tool

     7.6.3 Gross Horse power

     7.6.4 Unit Horse power

7.7 Examples for metal cutting

4 2
8

POWER IN THE WORKSHOP

8.1 Belt Drive

     8.1.1 Types of belt

     8.1.2 Types of belt drive

     8.1.3 Drive mechanism

             8.1.3.1 Direct drive

             8.1.3.2 Countershaft drive

     8.1.4 Power transmitted by a belt

8.2 Gear Drive

   8.2.1 Simple gear drive

   8.2.1 Gear train

   8.2.2 Gear box of Colchester lathe head

   8.2.3 Calculation for spindle speeds

4 2
9 Tutorial 4 2

Academic Year 2015-2016 Teaching Plan for Second Term(Subject Code:WS-2001)

Chapter Topics/Sub-topics of Syllabus Total Periods Total Duration (Week)
9

CUTTING TOOL ANGLES

9.1 Tool Nomenclature

       9.1.1 Definitions of tool parts

       9.1.2 Three Views of single point tool

9.2 Tool Angles

9.3 Tool Signature

9.4 Selection of Angles

9.5 Recommended angle for H.S.S Tool

9.6 Effected Angles

9.7 Calculation for effected angles

4 2
10

CUTTING TOOL MATERIALS

10.1 Introduction

10.2 Selection of Tool Materials

10.3 Properties of Tool Materials

       10.3.1 Wear Resistance

       10.3.2 Red Hardness

       10.3.3 Toughness

       10.3.4 Others

10.4 Classification of Tool Materials

       10.4.1 High Carbon Steel

       10.4.2 High Speed Steel

     10.4.3 Tungsten Carbide

       10.4.4 Ceramics

2 2
11

ENGINEERING MATERIALS

11.1 Introduction

11.2 Mechanical Properties of materials

11.3 Commercial Testing of materials

       11.3.1 Tensile Test

11.4 Iron

       11.4.1 Pig Iron

       11.4.2 Wrought Iron

       11.4.3 Gray Cast Iron

11.5 Plain Carbon Steel

       11.5.1 Low Carbon Steel

                 11.5.1.1 Mild Steel

                 11.5.1.2 Dead Mild Steel

11.5.2 Medium Carbon Steel

       11.5.3 High Carbon Steel

11.6 Alloy Steel

11.7 Heat Treatment

11.8 Non-ferrous Metals and Alloys  

       11.8.1 Aluminium

       11.8.2 Copper

       11.8.3 Tin

       11.8.4 Lead

       11.8.5 Zinc

       11.8.6 Bronze

       11.8.7 Brass

4 2
12

FOUNDRY

12.1 Definition

12.2 Casting

12.3 Pattern

       12.3.1 Definition

       12.3.2 Pattern making

       12.3.3 Pattern Allowance

       12.3.4 Types of Pattern

12.4 Sand Mould

12.5 Core

12.6 Gate

12.7 Riser

12.8 Cleaning and Finishing

12.9 Inspection

       12.9.1 Destructive Test

       12.9.2 Non-Destructive Test

2 2
13

SMITHY AND FORGING

13.1 Introduction

13.2 Forgeable Materials

13.3 Factors in Forging

     13.3.1 Metallurgical Factor

     13.3.2 Mechanical Factor

13.4 Forging Temperature

13.5 Grain Flow in Forging Parts

13.6 Advantages of forging

13.7 Disadvantage of forging

13.8 Forging Operations

       13.8.1 Upsetting

       13.8.2 Drawing Dawn

       13.8.3 Cutting

       13.8.4 Bending

       13.8.5 Punching and Drifting

       13.8.6 Setting Dawn

       13.8.7 Fullering

       13.8.8 Swaging

       13.8.9 Flattening

       13.8.10 Forge Welding

13.9 Forge or Furnace

13.10 Forging Tools

       13.10.1 Anvil

       13.10.2 Hammer

                 13.10.2.1 Hand Hammer

                 13.10.2.2 Sledge Hammer

13.11 Hand Tools

       13.11.1 Chisel

       13.11.2 Fuller

       13.11.3 Swage

       13.11.4 Swage Block

       13.11.5 Flatter and Set Hammer

       13.11.6 Punch and Drift

       13.11.7 Tong

4 2
14

INTERCHANGABLE SYSTEM

14.1 Terms and Definitions

       14.1.1 Limits

       14.1.2 Tolerance

                 14.1.2.1 Unilateral Tolerance

                 14.1.2.2 Bilateral Tolerance

       14.1.3 Allowance

       14.1.4 Sizes

                 14.1.4.1 Nominal Size

                 14.1.4.2 Basic Size

                 14.1.4.3 Design Size

                 14.1.4.4 Actual Size

14.2 Types of Fit

       14.2.1 Clearance Fit

       14.2.2 Interference Fit

       14.2.3 Transition Fit

14.3 Basic System

       14.3.1 Hole System

       14.3.2 Shaft System

14.4 Problems for Limits

2 2
15

ESTIMATION IN MACHINE SHOP

15.1 Introduction

15.2 Machine Time for Turning

15.3 Machine Time for Facing

15.4 Machine Time for Drilling

15.5 Determination of Tap Diameter Size

15.6 Machine Time for Tapping

15.7 Machine Time for Threading

15.8 Machine Time for Shaping

15.9 Machine Time for Milling

4 2
16

UNCONVENTIONAL METHOD OF MACHINING

16.1 Introduction

16.2 Types of Unconventional Methods

       16.2.1 Abrasive Jet Machining

                 16.2.1.1 Construction

                16.2.1.2 Operation

                 16.2.1.3 Advantages and Disadvantages

                 16.2.1.4 Fluid Jet Machining

       16.2.2 Electron Beam Machining

16.2.2.1 Construction

                 16.2.2.2 Operation

       16.2.2.3 Advantages and Disadvantages

       16.2.3 Plasma Arc Machining

16.2.3.1 Construction  

                 16.2.3.2 Operation

16.2.3.3 Advantages and Disadvantages

2 2
17

NUMERICAL CONTROL SYSTEM

17.1 Fully Automatic System

17.2 Open Loop Control System

17.3 Close Loop Control System

17.4 Definitions of G Code, M Function and Others

17.5 Definition of X Axis and Z Axis

17.6 Definition of Absolute and Incremental Mode

17.7 Programs for given workpiece according to each mode

4 2

Academic Year 2015-2016 Teaching Plan for First Term(Subject Code:WS-5001)

Chapter Topics/Sub-topics of Syllabus Total Periods Total Duration (Week)
 1

INTRODUCTION

1.1 Production Planning

1.2 Product Manufacturing

1.3 Product Inspection

 6  12
2

Quality Control

2.1 Sorting Defective Items

2.2 Statistical Quality Control

2.2.1 Fundamental Concept of Statistics

      2.2.2 Frequency Distribution Diagram

      2.2.3 Samples Means Frequency Diagram

2.3 Central Limit Theorem

2.4 Process Control Charts

      2.4.1 and R Chart

      2.4.2 Warning Lines on the X Chart and R Chart

2.5 Rule of Seven

2.6 Chart Review and Action

2.7 Calculation of Standard deviation from Sample Mean range

2.8 Performance Limits of a Process and Specification limits of a Product

2.9 Relative Precision Index (R.P.I)

      2.9.1 Classification Table for R.P.I

2.10 P Chart: Process Control Chart for Attributes

      2.10.1 Frequency Distribution for Sample Fraction Defectives (P distribution)

2.11 Sampling Inspection (Acceptance sampling)

      2.11.1 Applications

2.12 Operating Characteristic Curve (OC curve) of a Sampling Plan

2.13 Calculation of Probability of Acceptance L(P′)

2.14 Double Sampling Scheme

2.15 Cost of Inspection

15 5
3

MEASURMENT AND GAGING

3.1 Manufacturing Specifications

3.2 Tolerances

       3.2.1 Ways of Specifying Tolerances

       3.2.2 Methods of Assigning Tolerances

3.3 Limits and Fits

3.4 Choosing of Manufacturing Tolerances

3.5 Assembly Methods

3.6 Assigning Tolerances to Mating Parts

3.7 Determination of Tools for Given Allowance of Two Mating Parts

       3.7.1 For 100% Interchangeability

       3.7.2 For Statistical Average Interchangeability

3.8 Alternative Method for Calculating Tolerance for Two mating Parts for 100% interchangeability

3.9 Geometric Dimensions and Tolerances

3.10 Gages

       3.10.1 Measuring with Light Rays

12 4
4

GEARS AND GEAR MANUFACTURE

4.1 Introduction to gears

4.2 Gear tooth curves

4.3 Elements of gear teeth

4.4 Types of gears

4.4.1 Classification of gears

4.5 Introduction to gear manufacturing

4.6 Forming gear teeth

     4.6.1 Casting

     4.6.2 Sintering or P/M process

     4.6.3 Injection molding

     4.6.4 Extruding

     4.6.5 Cold drawing

     4.6.6 Stamping

     4.6.7 Pre-forming

     4.6.8 Forging

4.7 Machining

     4.7.1 Roughing processes

               4.7.1.1 Gear form-cutting

               4.7.1.2 Gear generating

     4.7.2 Finishing processes

4.8 Gear inspection

       4.8.1 Checking the sizes of gears and gear teeth

       4.8.2 Checking gear tooth profile

       4.8.3 Checking the positions of gear teeth

       4.8.4 Checking gear tooth bearing and surface finish

       4.8.5 Checking for noise

15 5

Academic Year 2015-2016Teaching Plan for Second Term(Subject Code:WS-5001)

5

METAL CUTTING

1.1Introduction

1.2Terms and definitions

1.3Chip formation

       1.3.1Continuous chip

       1.3.2Continuous chip with built up edge

       1.3.3Discontinuous chip or segmental chip

1.4The forces acting on the cutting tool and their measurement

1.5Specific cutting energy in machining

1.6Metal cutting theory

1.7Cutting tool shape for orthogonal cutting

1.8Cutting theory

     1.8.1 Coefficient of friction

    1.8.2 Determining shear plane angle

    1.8.3 Chip thickness ratio

    1.8.4 Velocity system of cut

    1.8.5 Shear strain of chip

    1.8.6 Shear stress

    1.8.7 Power required for machining

1.9 Basic metal cutting theory by Ernst& Merchant

     1.9.1 Modified theory

15 5
6

COMPUTER NUMERICAL CONTROL

1.1 Introduction

     1.1.1 Definition

     1.1.2 Applications

     1.1.3 Advantages and limitations

1.2 Elements of a CNC

     1.2.1 Part program

     1.2.2 Machine control unit

     1.2.3 Machine tools

           1.2.3.1 Machines using CNC

1.3 Principles of CNC

   1.3.1 Basic length unit

   1.3.2 Cartesian coordinate system

   1.3.3 CNC positioning systems

   1.3.4 Interpolation

   1.3.5 positioning reference point systems

   1.3.6 Work coordinates

   1.3.7 Machine zero point or machine home

   1.3.8 Work settings and offsets

   1.3.9 Tool length offset

   1.3.10 Control loop systems

1.4 Precision in CNC machining

1.5 Part programming for CNC

     1.5.1 Programming format

     1.5.2 Word address format

     1.5.3 Codes

21 7
7

METAL SHEARING AND FORMING

1.1Metal shearing operations

1.2Principle of metal shearing

1.3Bending

1.4Drawing

1.5Metal spinning

1.6High energy rate forming

1.7Squeezing

1.8Press

1.9Stock feeding devices

1.10Safety devices

12 4

Marking Scheme for WS-2001 (Workshop Technology)

100 Marks Remark
Exam 70% Tutorial 5% Practical 15% Class Room Performance (Practical Performance Test) 10%
1st Exam 35% Tutorial Roll Call 5% Theory Understanding 2%  
2nd Exam 35% Job Mark 5% Instrument Application 2%  
Job Report 5% Instruct 2%  
Unity 2%  
Result 2%  

Marking Scheme for WS-5001(Production Technology)

Theory Understanding 20
Instrument Application 20
Interest 20
Unity 20
Finishing 20
Total 100
100 Marks Remark
Exam 70% Tutorial 10% Practical 10% Class Room Performance 10%
1st Exam 35% Tutorial Assignment 5% Roll Call 2%  
2nd Exam 35%
Practical 5% Oral Test 2%  
Tutorial Test 3%  
Practical Test 3%  

Photo Gallery

News Letter

Make sure you dont miss interesting happenings by joining our newsletter program.

Contact Us

Myanmar Aerospace Engineering University
Mandalay Road, Meiktila, Mandalay Division
The Republic of the Union of Myanmar

  • Hot line: 95 – 064 – 35244, 35241
  • Fax: 95 – 064 – 35245
  • Email: info@maeu.edu.mm

Connect with us

Member Login or Register